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Archive for November, 2013

2014 Youth Pork Ambassador Program

Wednesday, November 27th, 2013

Utah Agricultural Education students, how would you like a $2,500.00 scholarship? If you said “yes,” are you interested in the pork industry and working with people statewide? Then, plan now to apply for the Utah Pork Producers “Youth Pork Ambassador Program.” This program is open to both high school and postsecondary Agricultural Education students interested in learning more about and representing the Utah pork industry. The ambassadors will receive up to a $2,500 scholarship.

The Utah Youth Pork Ambassador Program is designed to provide youth with an opportunity to:
> Become actively involved in the pork industry.
> Participate in hands-on experience in the many facets of pork production and agriculture in the state of Utah.
> Develop strong relationships with the various types of pork producers throughout the state of Utah.
> Gain a better understanding of the pork industry.
> Develop and improve communication and leadership skills.

The main goal of the Youth Pork Ambassador is to promote the Utah Pork Producers Association and the pork industry at various events. The successful candidate will gain valuable experience and develop relationships that will last a lifetime. The ambassador will also receive up to a $2,500 scholarship, payable to a technical school, community college, or a 4-year university at the end of the program.

To apply for the 2014 Youth Pork Ambassador Program download the information and application from the Utah FFA Association homepage at: www.utffa.org.

 Applications are due Friday, December 20, 2013.

Digital Media Arts Festival T-shirt and Poster Contest

Monday, November 25th, 2013

The coordinators of the 2014 Utah Digital Media Arts Festival (DMAF) are soliciting entries for the T-shirt and poster contest for the Festival. Students are asked to come up with their own 3-5 word theme for the Festival, with a focus on design, creativity, and/or digital media, and then design a T-Shirt and poster illustrating that theme.

The DMAF is a yearly competition/festival that gives students the opportunity to showcase his or her best work, and for students to see projects from all around the state.  The winning poster will be given to educators attending the UACTE Winter Conference and in May the T-shirt will be given to attendees of the Digital Media Arts Festival. The winner will be awarded a trophy at the Festival.

T-shirt design requirements:

  • The T-Shirt is a one color silkscreen.
    Choose one color for the T-shirt and one color for the ink.
  • Size: 11″ x 17″
  • Submit design in a 300 dpi vector/.ai file format.
  • The design can be either for the front or the back of the T-shirt.
  • The winning design becomes the property of the Digital Media Arts Festival.

Poster design requirements:

  • The poster is full color.
  • Size: 11″ x 17″ and 17″ x 22″
  • Submit design in a 300 dpi vector/.ai file format.
  • The winning design becomes the property of the Digital Media Arts Festival.
  • The poster design should include the chosen theme and festival categories listed below.
2D Animation Art Portfolio
2D Graphics – Raster Audio
2D Graphics – Vector Interactive Media
3D Animation Photography
3D Graphics Video
Animation – Stop Motion Web Design

Entry requirements:

  • Must be a Utah high school student.
  • Designs must consist of completely original artwork, absolutely NO clip-art or stock illustrations, and NO copyrighted material. Any typography must be licensed for free commercial use.
  • Student entering the contest must be willing to sign a media release.
  • Entries submitted via a drop box.
    Contact Mr. Jensen at djensen@dsdmail.net for submission details.

 The deadline for entering the contest is Friday, December 20, 2013.
The winner will be announced by January 31, 2014.

WATCH a slideshow video featuring the 2013 Digital Media Arts Festival winners.

 

Utah CTE Graphic Design Contest

Tuesday, November 19th, 2013

The Business Education and the Information Technology Education specialists, at the Utah State Office of Education, are in the process of planning their summer conference for Utah educators. The organizers of each conference invite YOU (Utah middle/junior high and high school students) to design the graphic for their summer conference program materials. The winning graphic for Business Education and for Information Technology Education will be printed on the program cover, welcome posters, vendor punch cards, and thank you cards. This is a wonderful opportunity to showcase your talent and creativity as you design a “unique graphic” for each conference.

Each entry will be judged by a state committee of Business Education teachers and Information Technology Education teachers. An entry will be selected for the Business Education summer conference and for the Information Technology Education summer conference. Each winner will receive a one-year subscription to the Adobe creative Cloud Suite worth $600. The winners will be announced by March 3, 2014.

Designs must consist of completely original artwork, absolutely NO clip-art or stock illustrations, and NO copyrighted material. Any typography must be licensed for free commercial use. Designs must be scalable to work in both large and small formats. The winning designs will be the sole property of the Utah State Office of Education to be used in any manner. The winning designers will be fully credited with their design work. The name and picture of each winner will be featured on the summer conference program.

> Business Education graphic design contest ENTRY REQUIREMENTS
> Information Technology Education graphic design contest ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

Entries MUST be received by Monday, January 6, 2014.

Questions?
Contact: Andrea Curtin – Utah State Office of Education – 801-538-7976

January will be here before you know it, so don’t delay in creating your design for the Business Education summer conference or for the Information Technology Education Education contest. Good luck!

 

Plan Now to Participate in the Hour of Code Event

Wednesday, November 13th, 2013

In celebration of Computer Science Education Week, plan now to participate in the Hour of Code event December 9-15, 2013. The first annual Hour of Code is a campaign to encourage 10 million students to learn to code. Steve Jobs, co-founder, chairman, and CEO of Apple Inc. believed, “Everyone in this country should learn how to program a computer because it teaches you how to think.”

The goal of the Hour of Code campaign is to demystify computer science for students across the country. Through introductory tutorials, that can be completed online, on a smartphone, or even unplugged, students will learn the basics of how to code. Code.org is challenging teachers, parents and even employers to encourage students of all ages to participate during Computer Science Education Week.

Participate at your school
Participate in your community
Participate at your workplace

Did you know?

  • Software jobs outnumber students 3-to-1.
  • The gap is 1 million jobs over 10 years and these are some of the highest paying jobs.
  • 90 percent of schools in the US do not teach computer science.
  • In many countries, computer science is required (China, Vietnam, Estonia. Soon UK, Australia)
  • The basics of coding can be learned by anybody, starting in elementary school. But fewer than 10 percent of students try and only 2 percent are women.

There is no need to wait until December 9, 2013 to start learning how to code. Start now by trying out one of the programs listed below:

Scratch
Codecademy
Khan Academy
CodeHS

“Whether you’re trying to make a lot of money or whether you just want to change the world, computer programming is an incredibly empowering skill to learn, says Hadi Partovi, co-founder and CEO, Code.org.

To join this event sign up HERE and WATCH what people are saying about the Hour of Code.

Employment by Industry

Wednesday, November 6th, 2013

The Career Highlight is usually devoted to information organized by categories focused on occupations, but this month we decided to take an industry perspective. There are some occupations that are fairly industry specific – doctors and nurses are largely employed within the health care industry, and mining machine operators work in the mining industry. However, there are many occupations employed across industries. For example, computer programmers, administrative assistants, office managers, and custodians are needed in almost any work environment, no matter the industry. Therefore – especially when jobs are scarce – it’s worth thinking about pursuing opportunities outside the industry most often associated with your occupation. That is, check out businesses and organizations within growth industries to find jobs that will use your skills and may offer better security and wages than the same occupation in an industry that is declining.

The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) organizes industries into just two very broad groups: goods producing, or service providing. The goods-producing industries include: ¨ Construction; ¨ Manufacturing; ¨ Mining.  Service-providing industries include: Educational services; Financial activities; Health care and social assistance; Information; Leisure and hospitality; Professional and business services; Public administration; Trade, transportation, and utilities. Service-providing industries are projected to account for the most job growth through 2020. As illustrated below, employment is projected to increase by more than 5.6 million in the health care and social assistance sector, with home health care and family services leading that growth. Providers of management, scientific, and technical consulting services will lead the growth in the professional and business services. For additional details, consult this article in the Occupational Outlook Quarterly. For Utah-specific industry outlook information, you may be interested in the regional Industry Briefs developed by the Utah Department of Workforce Services.

What Will The Future Look Like?

Wednesday, November 6th, 2013

By Gary Wixom
Assistant Commissioner for Career and Technical Education
Utah System of Higher Education

The Great Recession has had an impact on the lives of American citizens that will be felt for a long time to come. Trillions of dollars of American wealth were lost and the impact on employment had disrupted plans of both the young and the old. According to a new study by Georgetown University’s Center on Education and the Workforce, what was once a “lockstep march from school to work and then on to retirement no longer applies for a growing share of Americans.”1 In the past, most Americans completed their education, moved onto full-time employment, and then retired at age 65. The education phase of the cycle often was completed at the high school level, and after some on-the-job-training, full-time work was the norm. Today, a new model for this cycle is emerging that includes additional education, changes in employment patterns, longer full-time working careers, and often a transition into retirement.

According to the Georgetown study, blue-collar jobs which used to be widely available have disappeared. As these jobs disappeared many young people have had a difficult time moving fully into the labor market. The labor market is changing rapidly. In 1980 the share of young people in blue-collar occupations was 54 percent. In 2010 this number had decreased to 36 percent. In the year 2000 the employment rate for young adults was 84 percent and by the year 2012 that percentage had decreased to 72 percent. Young adults at all levels were negatively impacted by the Great Recession, but those who had some sort of postsecondary certificate of degree felt the impact the least.

So, how do we prepare for the world where the education and employment cycle is changing? First by becoming college and career ready while in high school, and then by following a pathway that will lead to a certificate or degree, that leads to employment and a livable wage.

Check with your CTE teacher or school counselor about the many exciting CTE Career Pathways that are available to you to follow. Choose the courses that will help move you forward, and be serious about preparing for the future. What your education and employment cycle will look like depends on how well you prepare today.

1Anthony P. Carnevale, Andrew R. Hanson, Artem Gulish, Failure to Launch-Structural Shift and the New Lost Generation, Georgetown Public Policy Institute, Center on Education and the Workforce, September 2013.