← Utah CTE Blog Home

Build a Skill for Life

Students interested in manufacturing tend to have a few traits in common: they are problem solvers, creative thinkers, good with computers, and meticulous about details. If these traits describe you then you should consider a career in manufacturing. In today’s knowledge-based workplace skilled workers are at a premium. Those who are successful have specialized skills, hands-on training, and problem-solving skills. In every manufacturing occupation a working knowledge of math is crucial. Students working in manufacturing will need to easily calculate mathematical problems using concepts learned from algebra, geometry, and trigonometry.

Through Career and Technical Education, Skilled and Technical Sciences Education (STS) has five Pathways in Precision Production Trades that lead to careers in manufacturing. By taking STS courses students can obtain industry certification and be ready to work in a manufacturing career shortly after high school.

Precision Production Trades
Cabinetmaking/Millwork Pathway
Drafting/CAD Pathway
Graphics/Printing Pathway
Machine Tool
Welding

Manufacturing in Utah:
> There are over 3,974 manufacturing firms in the state.
> 113,000 people are employed in the manufacturing industry.
> Payroll in the manufacturing industry totals over $1.3 million.
> The average monthly wage in the manufacturing industry is $3,962,
    which is 16.8 percent higher than the statewide average monthly wage.
> Manufacturing equals 8.9 percent of all state employment.
> Utah’s manufacturing industry is currently the 3rd largest industry
    in the state for total employment.
(Source: Utah Manufacturers Association and Utah Department of Workforce Services) 

Kaydee Walters

Jobs in manufacturing require workers who can interpret blueprints, program computerized machining, and solve problems quickly. Kaydee Walters, a recent graduate from Tooele High School, was the gold medal winner in cabinetmaking at the National Skills and Leadership Conference for SkillsUSA in Kansas City. She was the first female, ever, to win this competition. Through participation in CTE Kaydee learned and mastered the specialized skills that will lead her to a successful career in manufacturing. “My CTE classes in high school prepared me in many ways. Such as teaching me the knowledge I needed to know about woodworking, learning about all the tools and machines and how to use them, and how to create and read plans.”

Get started and build a skill for life!

One Response to “Build a Skill for Life”

  1. Dale Pfister Says:

    Good info I can use with our folks here in Weber School District. Thanks.

Leave a Reply

*