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Archive for the ‘Career and Technical Education’ Category

What Will The Future Look Like?

Wednesday, November 6th, 2013

By Gary Wixom
Assistant Commissioner for Career and Technical Education
Utah System of Higher Education

The Great Recession has had an impact on the lives of American citizens that will be felt for a long time to come. Trillions of dollars of American wealth were lost and the impact on employment had disrupted plans of both the young and the old. According to a new study by Georgetown University’s Center on Education and the Workforce, what was once a “lockstep march from school to work and then on to retirement no longer applies for a growing share of Americans.”1 In the past, most Americans completed their education, moved onto full-time employment, and then retired at age 65. The education phase of the cycle often was completed at the high school level, and after some on-the-job-training, full-time work was the norm. Today, a new model for this cycle is emerging that includes additional education, changes in employment patterns, longer full-time working careers, and often a transition into retirement.

According to the Georgetown study, blue-collar jobs which used to be widely available have disappeared. As these jobs disappeared many young people have had a difficult time moving fully into the labor market. The labor market is changing rapidly. In 1980 the share of young people in blue-collar occupations was 54 percent. In 2010 this number had decreased to 36 percent. In the year 2000 the employment rate for young adults was 84 percent and by the year 2012 that percentage had decreased to 72 percent. Young adults at all levels were negatively impacted by the Great Recession, but those who had some sort of postsecondary certificate of degree felt the impact the least.

So, how do we prepare for the world where the education and employment cycle is changing? First by becoming college and career ready while in high school, and then by following a pathway that will lead to a certificate or degree, that leads to employment and a livable wage.

Check with your CTE teacher or school counselor about the many exciting CTE Career Pathways that are available to you to follow. Choose the courses that will help move you forward, and be serious about preparing for the future. What your education and employment cycle will look like depends on how well you prepare today.

1Anthony P. Carnevale, Andrew R. Hanson, Artem Gulish, Failure to Launch-Structural Shift and the New Lost Generation, Georgetown Public Policy Institute, Center on Education and the Workforce, September 2013.

 

Three Things You Should Know About CTE and High School Graduation

Tuesday, October 8th, 2013

By Mary Shumway
State Director of Career, Technical, and Adult Education
Utah State Office of Education

To be ready for life after high school, students first need to graduate. To follow are three often-cited reasons that students drop out (Johnston, J. H. (2010) Dropout Prevention: A Research Brief. Fairfield, CT: Education Partnerships, Inc.,) followed by some examples of ways that Career and Technical Education (CTE) can help prevent students from dropping out.

1.       Academic Factors
Students who receive poor grades are more likely to drop out, but CTE concentrators improved their 12th grade NAEP scores by eight points in reading and 11 in math, while students who took no CTE courses did not increase their math scores and their reading scores improved by just four points. (Department of Education, National Assessment of Vocational Education, 2004) A ratio of one CTE class for every two academic classes minimizes the risk of student dropping out of high school. (Plank et al, Dropping Out of High School and the Place of Career and Technical Education, National Research Center for CTE, 2005)

2.       Occupational Aspirations
Without a clear picture of the opportunities available to them, students are at risk of dropping out. Most careers are made up of a series of jobs, each requiring higher skills and more experience than the one before. By participating in Career and Technical Education, students are exposed to, and prepared for, the first rung on their career ladder. In addition, research shows that CTE students develop problem-solving, project completion, communication, time management, critical thinking and other cross functional skills in demand by today’s employers. (Society for Human Resource Management and WSJ.com/Careers, Critical Skills Needs and Resources for the Changing Workforce, 2008)

3.       Disengaged Students
There are many students who don’t feel connected to their school experience, perhaps even feel that there is no one there who is interested in or cares about them. A recent report (Making the Case for CTE: What the Research Shows, National Center for CTE, 2013) claims that boys, especially, are struggling. But the hands-on, project-based learning strategies that are standard in most CTE programs appeal to a wide variety of students. In addition, students who participate in Career Technical Student Organizations (CTSOs) enjoy higher academic motivation and engagement. (Looking Inside the Black Box: The Value Added by Career and Technical Student Organizations to Students’ High School Experience, National Research Center for CTE, 2007)

Utah CTE Fact Sheet — Career and Technical Education Produces Results

The Time to Participate in CTE is Now

Thursday, September 5th, 2013

By Gary Wixom
Assistant Commissioner for Career and Technical Education
Utah System of Higher Education

We are hearing a lot of discussion these days about what is wrong with education and that education needs to be “reformed.” As educational reform takes place, and as education changes to meet the needs of the global economy, Career and Technical Education is a big part of the solution.

In a speech recently given by the Secretary of Education, he said:

It seems easier to define college-readiness than career-readiness, even if there is a great deal of overlap. At the Department, we define a college-ready student as someone who has the knowledge and skills to succeed in credit-bearing courses from day one, without remediation. That standard must be the new bar for success for all high schools, for all students–instead of the old goal of getting students a diploma.

The bar for a career-ready student is just as demanding. CTE students also must have the academic skills to be able to engage in postsecondary education and training without the need for remediation. The cause of strengthening CTE programs should never be an excuse for reducing rigor and tracking students away from pursuing a college degree .i

Did you know Career and Technical Education (CTE) is engaged in preparing both youth and adults in a wide range of careers leading to great paying jobs and a great future? These careers require various levels of education from industry certifications, postsecondary certificates and associate degrees, to four-year degrees.

According the U.S. Department of Education almost all high school students participate in CTE, and more than half take three or more credits completing a CTE program of study. These CTE programs of study equip students with core academic skills, employability skills, and job-specific and technical skills related to a specific career pathway.

Data indicates that when students take CTE classes they are at less risk of dropping out of high school. ii The average high school graduation rate for students concentrating in CTE programs is 90 percent, compared to an average national freshman graduation rate of 74.9 percent. iii More than 70 percent of secondary CTE concentrators went on to pursue postsecondary education certificates and degrees, and 4 out of 5 secondary CTE graduates who pursued postsecondary education after high school had earned a credential or were still enrolled two years later. iv

Career and Technical Education is working. Get started early following a CTE Pathway to success. To find out what career and technical education opportunities are available to you, talk with one of your school counselors or teachers today.

Sources:
i http://www.ed.gov/news/speeches/new-cte-secretary-duncans-remarks-career-and-technical-education

ii (Plank et al., Dropping Out of High School and the Place of Career and Technical Education, 2005)

iii U.S. Department of Education, Office of Vocational and Adult Education, Consolidated Annual Report for the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act of 2006 Program Year 2007–2008, unpublished data [National Association of State Directors of Career Technical Education Consortium analysis]; U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, Public School Graduates and Dropouts From the Common Core of Data: School Year 2007–2008, 2010.

iv U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, Postsecondary and Labor Force Transitions Among Public High School Career and Technical Education Participants, 2011.

Don’t think of summer ending …think of school beginning!

Wednesday, August 14th, 2013

By Mary Shumway
State Director of Career, Technical, and Adult Education
Utah State Office of Education

It’s hard to believe but it’s that time of the year again – the beginning of a new school year. Your Career and Technical Education (CTE) teachers have spent part of the summer updating their knowledge and skills to ensure that your classroom experiences are better than ever. Welcome back!

In recent years Career and Technical Education has faced some challenges. Between No Child Left Behind legislation, increased graduation requirements in math and science, accountability in academic subjects and budget cuts, CTE has had difficulty maintaining a full range of options in some schools. But a recent article – “Stop Stigmatizing Vocational Education” (published online by RealClearPolicy, a catch-all source for policy news and commentary) – suggests that Career and Technical Education needs to become a greater focus in our education system. New technologies (e.g., hydraulic fracturing), global economic trends (e.g., rising wages in Asia), and domestic policy changes are bringing manufacturing jobs back to the U.S.

What does this mean for today’s CTE students? Even as our nation redefines the knowledge and skill requirements of these new energy and manufacturing jobs, you can be assured that the CTE experiences you have today are designed to help you be college and career ready. That’s because not only does CTE help you develop technical knowledge and skills, CTE also offers opportunities to develop the social capital, employability skills, and the positive work ethic that will make you a quality worker, no matter the specific job.

Here are five ways to maximize your CTE experience this year:

1.  Develop a meaningful College and Career Plan. Talk to your counselor about what types of high school courses are available to help you learn the hands-on skills required in careers of interest to you. Get advice about what postsecondary options are most likely to promote your success, given both your personal and career goals. For most students this plan must also include specific information about how you will pay for the costs associated with your postsecondary training.

2.  Commit to a CTE Career Pathway. A Pathway is like an educational map that will guide you to the high school and postsecondary options that best support your career goals.

3.  Participate in a Career and Technical Student Organization (CTSO). Discover the CTSO most related and active for your CTE Area of Study. Every CTSO is designed to advance student leadership, citizenship, and professionalism. Through regional, state and national conferences, members have opportunities to be involved in service projects, showcase their technical skills, and network with one another.

4.  Take advantage of the Skill Certificate Program. Skill Certificates verify the technical skills that you have attained by taking a CTE course and demonstrating your competencies through an assessment. There are Skill Certificate tests associated with every CTE Area of Study.

5.  Take part in Work-Based Learning. Internships, Service Learning, Job Shadows, Field Studies and Career Fairs are just some of the ways to be involved in learning that extends your classroom experiences to the world beyond.

Career and Technical Education is the most meaningful part of high school for many, many students. For some it provides a much-needed glimpse into the future where they can successfully compete for interesting, well-paying jobs. For others it might simply be the first taste of an area of study that they will want to pursue in more depth in high school and beyond. Whatever CTE means to you, may this school year bring you every opportunity to succeed today and in the future.

The T in STEM stands for TECHNOLOGY

Wednesday, May 1st, 2013

By Gary Wixom
Assistant Commissioner for Career and Technical Education
Utah System of Higher Education

We continue to hear that at a time of high unemployment there are many jobs that go unfilled. The reason: American workers lack the necessary skills to fill those jobs. Many are blaming this on a lack of preparation in the areas of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math.) During the 2013 session of the Utah State Legislature, a bill was passed to address these issues here in Utah. The bill “House Bill 139” created a Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Action Center. The Action Center, and an Action Center Board, that is charged with providing science and technology-based education to elementary and secondary students and to expose public education students to college level science and technology disciplines.

According to “Utah’s Federal R & D and STEM Jobs Report” if we want the next generation of students to have jobs that provide a livable wage we need to make science research and development and STEM Education a top priority. Utah’s students need to know that by the year 2018, there will be 101,000 STEM-related jobs that will need to be filled. Most of these jobs will require some postsecondary education and training.

There is no question that the “STEM Problem” is getting worse, not better. The number of students interested in STEM careers here in Utah is slightly below the national average. According to data from the Utah System of Higher Education, the top 10 graduation majors for Utah Students in 2010 and 2011 were: 

The hope is that the new STEM Action Center will provide solutions that will help close the achievement gaps and encourage more students to enter the STEM related career fields.

Too often when national leaders focus on STEM issues, the discussion is centered only on Science and Math. Certainly these two areas are critically important. A solid foundation in math skills is essential to be “college and career ready”. Technology is also an important component of STEM. Technology covers a wide variety of career pathways that are in demand, have high wages, but at the same time do not always require a four-year degree.

Here are just a few of the great opportunities that exist in the “Technology” portion of STEM.

Educators: Let’s remember that Technology is an important part of the STEM discussion and make sure that students are aware that these Technology careers are a part of the solution to getting the United States working again, lowering the unemployment rate and helping to grow a dynamic economy for the future.

Students: Talk to your CTE teacher or school counselor about the many opportunities in STEM related careers.

CTE: Meeting the Needs of Utah’s Workforce

Wednesday, April 3rd, 2013

By Mary Shumway
State Director of Career, Technical, and Adult Education
Utah State Office of Education

Last year, at the Utah Education Summit, Governor Herbert announced his plan to ensure Utah is “on pace” to have 66 percent of the adult population earn a post-secondary degree or certification by the year 2020. The plan is called “On PACE to 66% by 2020.”

At the summit, Governor Herbert stated, “As we compete in what is now a global economy, education will be the key and the catalyst that sets Utah apart. An education system that aligns perfectly with the needs of the marketplace will do wonders in spurring economic growth and innovation. This is the focus of my plan for 66 percent by 2020, and we are on pace to achieve it.”

PACE stands for:
P — Prepare Young Learners
A — Access for All Students
C — Complete Certificates and Degrees
E — Economic Success

Incorporated within the plan is recognition that Career and Technical Education (CTE) is one solution to meeting the needs of Utah’s workforce. The plan is guiding the work of the state legislature, the Utah State Board of Education, the Utah College of Applied Technology, and the Utah Board of Regents. Some details of the plan that involve CTE are highlighted below:

  • Help students become college and career ready while they are young through career exploration, assistance from school counselors, and taking college readiness exams.
  • Help students transition to post-secondary education by including concurrent enrollment in CTE courses and distributing information on women in nontraditional careers.
  • Help students finish degrees and certificates,with emphasis on CTE certificates and associate degrees. The breakdown of the 66 percent is as follows:
    • 13 percent of Utahns with a certificate in an approved CTE certificate area.
    • 14 percent of Utahns with an associate degree, with the majority in CTE fields.
    • 28 percent of Utahns with a bachelor’s degree.
    • 11 percent of Utahns with a graduate degree.
  • Help students find work in their chosen fields or personal pursuits, with 90 percent of employer workforce needs met, including strong ties between CTE programs and economic needs.

It is an exciting time to be in Career and Technical Education, and to be part of the attainment of Utah’s educational and economic goals.

For more information on the Governor’s plan and priorities for education, visit http://www.utah.gov/governor/priorities/education.html.

Skill Attainment Requires Careful Career Planning

Monday, March 4th, 2013

By Gary Wixom
Assistant Commissioner for Career and Technical Education
Utah System of Higher Education

During the recent State of the Union Address, President Obama said that we must attract more jobs to our shores, that we needed to equip our citizens with additional skills so they can do those jobs, and we need to insure that hard work actually leads to a decent living. The President has identified some important goals with significant challenges attached. Moving the economy forward, particularly decreasing the unemployment rate has remained difficult for far too long.

Career and Technical Education (CTE) provides the answer to one of those challenges, making sure that there are skilled workers trained and ready to fill the jobs of today and tomorrow. By the year 2020, Utah is working to achieve the goal that 66 percent of adults will hold a postsecondary degree or a certificate. As we move toward that goal, it is interesting that many of the highest occupations in demand are in the areas of Career and Technical Education. Nursing and health occupations lead the list, and then operations management, sales, manufacturing, accountants, and construction managers. To be successful in these areas you need specific “skills” and those skills are obtained through Career and Technical Education training.

Successful skill attainment in these CTE areas requires careful career planning early in the educational sequence. Utah has great secondary programs that provide skills and will start students on a career path leading to employment or additional training. Connecting secondary and postsecondary programs together provide an efficient way for students to gain the skills necessary for occupations that provide a livable wage.

Did you know?

  • CTE programs help students achieve graduation at a higher rate than other students. The average high school graduation rate for students concentrating in CTE programs is 90.18 percent compared to a national graduation rate of 74.9 percent.i
  • CTE is an answer for the current a future shortage in skilled workers. Experts project 47 million job openings in the decade ending 2018. About one-third of those jobs will require an associate degree or certificate, and nearly all will require real-world skills that can be mastered through CTE.ii
  • CTE helps students be successful in attaining postsecondary certificates and degrees. Seventy percent of students concentrating in CTE areas stayed in postsecondary education or transferred to a four-year degree program. That compared to an overall average state target of 58 percent.iii

February was national CTE month and across the country states and organizations highlighted CTE programs. As the nation continues to recover from the great recession, and jobs expand and the economy grows again, it is a great time for CTE to take its place in helping the nation reach the goals that have been set.

Do your career planning early and let a CTE pathway lead you to success in your educational pursuits. The future is bright for those who prepare and obtain the skills that will be in demand for the economy of tomorrow.

I U.S. Department of Education, Office of Vocational and Adult Education, Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act of 2006, Report to Congress on State Performance, Program year 2007-2008. Washington, D.C.

ii Georgetown Center on Education and the Workforce via Harvard’s Pathways to Prosperity report, p. 29, http://cew.georgetown.edu/jobs2018/

iii U.S. Department of Education, http://www2.ed.gov/about/reports/annual/2010report/fy2010-apr.pdf

Work-Based Learning Opportunities

Thursday, February 7th, 2013

By Mary Shumway
State Director of Career, Technical, and Adult Education
Utah State Office of Education

Have you considered participating in a job shadow or internship? Students throughout Utah, through the Career and Technical Education Work-Based Learning program, have the opportunity to participate in job shadows (short-term work experience) and/or internships (long-term work experience) while in middle/junior high or high school. Participation in a job shadow will help you understand how classroom learning is applied in the world of work. Through this structured career activity you will play an active role in learning by observing an employee at a work site to gain valuable career information.

There are many ways for you to learn. You can learn in the classroom or learn in a real work setting. Learning becomes even more meaningful when it is performed in a real work setting. Participating in a job shadow and/or internship will provide you with an opportunity to relate what you are learning in school to the world of work and can provide you with the following skills:

Time management Interpersonal communication Leadership
Following directions Responsibility Ethics
Problem-solving    

A job shadow experience typically will last from three to six hours at a work site. During the job shadow experience, you will:

  • Observe a range of activities performed on the job.
  • Receive information about possible career interests.
  • Gain insight into the academic, technical and personal skills needed for a particular occupation.
  • Understand connections between education and careers.

Although a job shadow and an internship are both typically unpaid, the knowledge you will gain, the experiences in which you participate, and the connections you will make will be invaluable. You may not receive monetary compensation for your time, but the experience and school credit you gain are huge benefits as you prepare for life after high school. Job shadows and internships take students one step closer to becoming college and career ready!

Imagine shadowing a Web developer and learning how to effectively write code for a new website.

Imagine shadowing an engineer and learning how the concepts you studied in your engineering design class
apply to a construction site.

Imagine shadowing a nurse and learning how to take blood from a patient and then sending it to the lab for processing.

Participating in a job shadow and/or internship will help to prepare you with education and skills for the ever-changing world of work. We encourage you to talk to the Work-Based Learning Coordinator at your school to learn how to get started. Each year over 150,000 students participate in fantastic work-based learning opportunities. Make sure you’re one of them!

What will the year 2013 bring?

Tuesday, January 8th, 2013

By Gary Wixom
Assistant Commissioner for Career and Technical Education
Utah System of Higher Education

What will the year 2013 bring? If you search the Internet you find predictions for the New Year in almost any area you are interested in exploring. Predictions for what will happen to the economy, predictions for what will happen in politics, predictions for what will happen in education, predictions for the latest in technology, and you can even read about predictions on what the predictions will be! We often use the start of the calendar year as a time to do a little predicting of our own future and make resolutions about how to be “better”, to be “richer”, or to be “smarter.” Then, as the months slip away, we often settle in to what is comfortable and make little change in our lives.

A good way to start off the year 2013 is to make a goal to learn something new every day. After all, we are learning creatures—we come into the world needing to learn everything, and we spend the first years of our life focused on learning, so making a lifelong practice of learning is what makes humans unique. Today, learning is easier than ever before. We are confronted with loads of information on a daily basis. Information on any subject is just a click away on the Internet. What we do with that information is the key. Let’s make the year 2013 a year of learning no matter what station of life you find yourself in.

Did you know that nearly 30,000 high school students not only are learning in high school, but at the same time they are earning college credit through the concurrent enrollment program? Last year students earned over 194,000 college credits while still in high school and got a head start on their college/career pathway.

Research is showing that students who participate in concurrent enrollment courses improve their chances for success. Career and Technical Education (CTE) is a great place to begin a concurrent enrollment experience. Students who participate in CTE concurrent enrollment courses reduce the likelihood of dropping out of high school, they generally obtain more academic and technical skill than other students, transition to postsecondary training at a higher rate, and have a greater opportunity to obtain employment leading to a livable wage.

There will be many opportunities to “learn” during 2013. If you are still in high school, look into the many career pathways that are open to you, and take advantage of the concurrent enrollment program. If you have moved beyond high school, choose a career pathway that will lead to good employment and personal fulfillment. In the year 2013, let’s make it a year that we learn something new every day.

The “Career” in College and Career Ready

Wednesday, December 5th, 2012

By Mary Shumway
State Director of Career, Technical, and Adult Education
Utah State Office of Education

Have you heard that you need to be “College and Career Ready”? What exactly does that mean? You have most likely been told the importance of going to college and completing a degree. Have you thought about the “career” part of College and Career Ready?

Being career ready means that you also focus on: (1) specific employability skills—such as being to work on time, working as a team, etc., (2) entry-level job skills—computer skills, completing tasks, etc., (3) specific skills in an industry—such as health care, Information Technology certificate, etc.

All of these career ready skills are important to develop along with academic skills. A career-ready person effectively navigates pathways that connect both education and employment to achieve a successful and financially-secure career.

It is important to think about a career and know that it is more than just a job. Being career ready is something you work on your entire career. It requires you to be adaptable and committed to lifelong learning. Being career ready also means that a study has a mastery of key academic, technical and workplace knowledge, and skills. Skills may change and need to be adapted from one job to another as a person progresses along a career path.

A broad coalition of national education, business, philanthropic and policy groups has come together to create a clear, unified and focused vision for what it means to be career ready. The coalition is called the Career Readiness Partner Council—careerreadynow.org. Their goal is to enhance reform efforts around college and career readiness to include a more comprehensive understanding of what it means to be career ready.

The council recently released a statement entitled “Building Blocks for Change: What it Means to be Career Ready.” This statement makes clear that career readiness is a process of connecting “education and employment to achieve a fulfilling, financially-secure and successful career.” The document establishes that career readiness must foster “adaptability and a commitment to lifelong learning, along with a mastery of key knowledge, skills and dispositions that vary from one career to another and change over time.”

If you take advantage of Career and Technical Education courses, pathways, and leadership organizations you will be better prepared to meet your personal goals and the economic needs of Utah and the nation. Talk to your school counselor about participating in a CTE Pathway and about the courses you will need to take to put you on the path to a rewarding career. With the guidance of your school counselor, you and your parents can develop a PLAN to help you achieve your personal goals and to prepare for life after high school—college and “career.”