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Archive for the ‘Skilled and Technical Sciences Education’ Category

Meet Jacob Michael Argyle: Future Aerospace Composites Technician

Wednesday, May 4th, 2016

Jacob Argyle (STS)“As I progressed through school, I never saw myself going to a four-year college. I was more interested in a career where I could move around and work with my hands. When I got into junior high school I took CTE classes like woodworking, metals, and basic welding. I really enjoyed them. When I got to high school, my counselor told me about Mountainland Applied Technology College (MATC) and that I could begin training for a hands-on career while in high school. It caught my attention. I decided that composites would be the best option for me.

“My long-term occupation and educational goal is to get a job working in the aerospace industry making composites. I appreciate the opportunity I have had to pursue CTE classes, both in high school and in the composites program at MATC. I feel like I have a head start on my future career. I feel that through taking CTE classes I was able to find a plan that will work for me.”

—Jacob Michael Argyle, Pleasant Grove High School

Jacob Michael Argyle - STS

UtahCTE.org congratulates Jacob on the CTE Scholarship and Tuition Award he received to Mountainland Applied Technology College. Jacob was one of 102 students honored at the CTE Scholarships and Tuition Awards banquet on Tuesday, April 19, 2016.

Apply Now: The mikeroweWORKS Foundation Competitor Scholarship

Thursday, March 31st, 2016

Dave and Mike RoweIn partnership with SkillsUSA, the mikeroweWORKS Foundation is proud to offer a scholarship opportunity for SkillsUSA members. The mikeroweWORKS Foundation scholarship provides assistance to eligible students who are pursuing an education in manufacturing, construction, automotive, engineering, and STEM-related careers. Apply now to receive financial assistance to attend the SkillsUSA National Championship in Louisville, Kentucky.

What: The mikeroweWORKS Foundation Competitor Scholarship 

Who: SkillsUSA student members (secondary and postsecondary) who have competed and placed first in their state association competition.

Why: To receive financial assistance to attend the SkillsUSA National Championships, June 20-24, 2016 in Louisville, Kentucky.

How:
> The award is based on a student-written, one-page narrative, describing the financial need for the scholarship, including the lack of school or community resources in order to attend the 2016 SkillsUSA National Championships.
> A letter of support/recommendation written by the students advisor, or state director.

Requirements:
> Must be a gold medal winner at the 2016 state competition, advancing to national competition.
> Have never attended the National Leadership and Skills Conference prior to this year.
> Be a SkillsUSA member in good standing.
> Must reasonably demonstrate financial need for scholarship.

Deadline: Application is due Friday, May 27, 2016 (midnight EDT).

View the list of 2015 scholarship recipients.

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The mikeroweWORKS Foundation is a 501(c)(3) public charity that promotes work ethic and supports the skilled trades. As CEO of the Foundation, Mike Rowe spends a significant amount of time speaking about the country’s dysfunctional relationship with work, highlighting the widening skills gap, and challenging the persistent belief that a four-year degree is automatically the best path for the most people. Through its scholarship programs, including the Work Ethic Scholarship Program and the SkillsUSA Travel Scholarships, the Foundation provides financial assistance to qualified individuals with a passion to get trained for a skill that is in demand. The Foundation has been instrumental in granting more than $3 million in education for trade schools across the country. For more information, go to www.mikeroweworks.org.

I Completed a CTE Internship in the Field of Videography

Friday, February 26th, 2016

I’m Spencer Funk. I completed a CTE Internship at Rescue 1 Studios in the field of videography. Because of this experience I am going to be able to understand what it takes to be a sole proprietor. I learned that you may have your own office and get to have a fantastic income, but you do pay the price for that income. You have no one else to bounce ideas off of and you have to do all of the work. You don’t get paid overtime, you just get what is there and nothing more. If you have a low income month you have low income for your family or for yourself that month. If you have a high income month you get a high income for yourself or family.

I have had the chance to learn how to use video and photo editing software and make my own videos and photos. I learned how to use a camera more efficiently to take a picture. All in all, this has been a fabulous experience in my life that will help me decide what I want to go into when I grow up. Videography could very well be the career of my choice.

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Commercial Photography is one of two Career and Technical Education Pathways in the Skilled and Technical Education/Visual Arts program area. Career and Technical Education (CTE) Internships are part of the Work-Based Learning (WBL) program. To participate in the Commercial Photography Pathway talk to your school counselor. To participate in a CTE Internship talk to the WBL coordinator at your school.

Career and Technical Education provides all students with a seamless education system from public education to postsecondary education, driven by a Plan for College and Career Readiness/SEOP. Through competency-based instruction and hands-on experiences, students obtain certified occupational skills, culminating in further education and meaningful employment. CTE prepares students for careers that are most in demand and that are part of the economic development of the state.

Career and Technical Education: Opportunities for Career Success

I Always Knew I Wanted to Become a Cosmetologist

Tuesday, February 23rd, 2016

Jordan Leigh HamiltonBy Jordan Leigh Hamilton

As a young girl, I always loved playing with hair and painting fingernails. As I grew older, I always knew I wanted to become a cosmetologist. I was very fortunate to have my credits close to being done in order to graduate, so I was given the option to participate in a CTE Internship. I knew I wanted to take this opportunity seriously, as I chose to go to Amara Hair Salon. I fell in love and knew this is what I wanted to do to make a living.

I am blessed to have the opportunity to participate in an apprenticeship at Amara, instead of going to actual hair school. I will learn all I need to know in the salon, and hopefully work there after I am through. I highly recommend participating in a CTE Internship.

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Cosmetology is one of two Career and Technical Education Pathways in the Skilled and Technical Sciences Education/Personal Services program area. Career and Technical Education (CTE) Internships are part of the Work-Based Learning (WBL) program. To participate in the Cosmetology/Barbering Pathway talk to your school counselor. To participate in a CTE Internship talk to the WBL coordinator at your school.

Career and Technical Education provides all students with a seamless education system from public education to postsecondary education, driven by a Plan for College and Career Readiness/SEOP. Through competency-based instruction and hands-on experiences, students obtain certified occupational skills, culminating in further education and meaningful employment. CTE prepares students for careers that are most in demand and that are part of the economic development of the state.

Career and Technical Education: Opportunities for Career Success

Internships Are Awesome

Friday, February 19th, 2016

Alex McGinnis Nelson - photoBy Alex McGinnis Nelson

CTE has prepared me for life after high school. Through my last years of high school CTE has been really great, and enjoyable. This year has been what I would call amazing! My wonderful teacher, Mrs. Kristi Kemp, has been remarkable. I have never had a teacher that has cared so much about students, and about our careers, as much as she did. She set up my entire internship. All I had to do was show up, take a few tests, interview, find a letter of recommendation, and boom I was in! I cannot say I just showed up. I was prepared. It was all of the preparation Mrs. Kemp helped me with that got me the internship. She taught me how to interview properly and how write a good resume.

I was never confident that high school would prepare me to be career ready. But now as I am finished with numerous classes, having had awesome teachers and experiences, I feel very comfortable to take a step into the big real world. This is all from mock interviews, practicing resume writing, and learning how to simply communicate better with others, in all aspects of business and or jobs. I’m so happy CTE has prepared me for the future. I’m glad I have been able to stick to it, push through, and have a desire to learn.

The internship I participated in was with Unified Fire Authority. Now I am dead set on becoming a firefighter. Internships are not easy though. At least mine was not. They treated me like the real deal. They let me do a lot on all the medical calls and had me pull a lot of hose. But you know what? It was a blast and it is my dream job now.

CTE classes actually prepare you for your future. It is the best way to get out and discover what you can go do for a career, how to apply for a job, and also learn a bunch of different skills that CTE has to offer. Internships are awesome!

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Firefighting is one of two Career and Technical Education Pathways in the Skilled and Technical Sciences Education/Protective Services program area. Career and Technical Education (CTE) Internships are part of the Work-Based Learning (WBL) program. To participate in the Firefighting Pathway talk to your school counselor. To participate in a CTE Internship talk to the WBL coordinator at your school.

Career and Technical Education provides all students with a seamless education system from public education to postsecondary education, driven by a Plan for College and Career Readiness/SEOP. Through competency-based instruction and hands-on experiences, students obtain certified occupational skills, culminating in further education and meaningful employment. CTE prepares students for careers that are most in demand and that are part of the economic development of the state.

Career and Technical Education: Opportunities for Career Success

I Am Looking Forward to My Career in Automotive Mechanics

Friday, February 12th, 2016

By Kambren Wilcox

Fremont_STS_IMG_5416Throughout high school the courses I have taken have taught me how to be patient, work with my hands, and feel the satisfaction of finishing a project successfully. I have also spent many hours teaching younger students how to weld and about safety issues. I believe if time is spent on a project then it should be done to the best of my ability. I spent most of my CTE classes in metal shop, where I also learned automotive maintenance. This helped me decide to focus my interest for further education and a career in automotive mechanics.

As I look back at my time spent in CTE classes, I realize there was a great amount of responsibility and trust placed on me from my teachers because of my honesty and natural abilities. I spent a lot of time working while in high school, so this caused me to schedule my time, be productive, and still find time to have the social interaction that only happens in high school. My jobs have been varied, but always included opportunities for me to work with my hands, fix something that quit working, and helping people. I am looking forward to my career in automotive mechanics, because this is my comfort zone.

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Automotive Service Technician is one of four Career and Technical Education Pathways in the Skilled and Technical Sciences Education/Mechanics and Repairs program area. To participate in the Automotive Service Technician Pathway talk to your school counselor.

Career and Technical Education (CTE) provides all students with a seamless education system from public education to postsecondary education, driven by a Plan for College and Career Readiness/SEOP. Through competency-based instruction and hands-on experiences, students obtain certified occupational skills, culminating in further education and meaningful employment. CTE prepares students for careers that are most in demand and that are part of the economic development of the state.

Career and Technical Education: Opportunities for Career Success

 

Star Wars and SkillsUSA

Thursday, January 14th, 2016

2015-2016 National OfficersDid you know that Star Wars and SkillsUSA have a lot in common? Jedi Knights who had Master Jedi mentors grew stronger through structured competition and were committed to being good citizens of the universe. “This education framework of technical skills, personal skills, and leadership skills resulted in a highly effective Order that protected the Republic for hundreds of years.”1 Like the Jedi Knights, SkillsUSA members have teachers and advisors who mentor and support them throughout high school, college, and career. The SkillsUSA Framework illustrates how students fulfill the mission of the organization to empower members to become world-class workers, leaders, and responsible American citizens.

SkillsUSA has an impact on the lives of America’s future workforce through the development of personal, workplace, and technical skills that are grounded in academics.

Personal Skills

  1. Integrity
  2. Work Ethic
  3. Professionalism
  4. Responsibility
  5. Adaptability/Flexibility
  6. Self-Motivation

Workplace Skills

  1. Communication
  2. Decision Making
  3. Teamwork
  4. Multicultural Sensitivity and Awareness
  5. Planning, Organizing, and Management
  6. Leadership

Technical Skills Grounded in Academics

  1. Computer and Technology Literacy
  2. Job-Specific Skills
  3. Safety and Health
  4. Service Orientation
  5. Professional Development

 

SkillsUSA Framework graphic

The Framework:

  • Provides a common language for students to articulate what they gain from SkillsUSA participation to employers, school administrators, parents and other students.
  • Assesses student skill development along a learning continuum of awareness, demonstration and mastery.
  • Creates a vision for SkillsUSA programs at the local, state and national levels to ensure quality student-led experiences that build skills in all members.
  • Empowers every student to achieve career success.
  • Delivers a skill set demanded by business and industry, but lacking in many employees.
  • Ensures that every student member receives a consistent and specific skill set.

1 Read the story SKILLS FOR LIFE in the TIN CAN WIRE by Lorrie Bryan.

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Fifty years ago, 200 students, teachers, and administrators held a conference at a hotel in Nashville, Tennessee. In founding the Vocational Industrial Clubs of America, their goal was to establish a nationwide organization to represent trade and industrial education and to serve student needs.

Now, SkillsUSA is a nationwide network of students and instructors in a common bond with powerful industry partnerships, serving more than 11.6 million mem­bers. SkillsUSA changes lives every day. Students discover and grow their career passions and appreciate their own self-worth through the work and dedication of instructors, administrators, association directors, industry partners and alumni.

SkillsUSA Utah has more than 2,000 members in 79 chapters. Members are actively involved in SkillsUSA programs and events, leadership opportunities, community service activities, and advocating for Career and Technical Education. To become a member of SkillsUSA talk to the SkillsUSA advisor in your school.

 

Welding in Nebo School District

Thursday, January 7th, 2016

CaptureThe calendar says January, the temperature is cold outside, and it’s snowing. So to warm your day, we are reflecting on an event that students in Nebo School District participated in on a hot summer day.

Forty students enrolled in the welding program at Spanish Fork, Maple Mountain, and Salem Hills High Schools entered a float in the Spanish Fork Fiesta Days Parade. The float was a mobile fabrication shop displaying completed welding projects. In fact, students worked on welding projects while the float was in motion. A man along the parade route called out, “Keep those beads tight!” He was obviously a dedicated welder.

The fabrication trailer consisted of a large Miller 400 diesel DC power plant, a Miller Trailer Blazer, a Miller 252 mig, a 211 Miller Autoset, fabrication tables, and a cooling tank. The fabrication team consisting of Karson Jones, Allison Hallam, and Jared Graham welded non-stop during the entire parade route. They completed 150 receiver hitch logos for each community. The hitch logos were of the University of Utah and of Brigham Young University. The logos were plasma cut ovals that were prepared the day before. The mobile lab fabricators attached hitch stubs to each of the logos and the completed trimming was cooled. Hitch logos were then given to loyal fans along the parade route. Students escorted the lab distributing brochures describing the courses available in Nebo School District and the related career opportunities. In addition to the float, thirty students who had designed and fabricated drift trikes rode along the parade route.

The parade is just one of the many events these welding students participated in during the summer. They attended other community events in order to recruit and showcase the opportunities available to students in the welding and fabrication courses throughout Nebo School District.

Parade goers had never seen a welding float, so they were impressed with the fabrication trailer, the skills of each student, and the welding designs they created. Many commented that they thought the welding float was the best entry in the entire parade. “This opportunity was a great way to get the word out to the thousands of potential students about what opportunities await them in our educational system, said Jared Massick, teacher at Maple Mountain High School.”

View the fabrication trailer float in action at https://youtu.be/oLSDr8kjajw.

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Welding is one of five Career and Technical Education Pathways in the Skilled and Technical Sciences/Precision Production Trades program area. To participate in the Welding Pathway talk to your school counselor.

Focus On: Skilled and Technical Sciences Education

Monday, November 2nd, 2015

Murray_STS_IMG_8169Skilled and Technical Sciences Education prepares students for employment and/or continuing education opportunities in skilled trades and other technical occupations, as well as promoting quality programs based on recognized industry standards.

The Utah Skilled and Technical Sciences Education Pathways are based on the national skills standards, where applicable, and established state standards. Students have the opportunity to be a CTE Secondary Pathway Completer in one of twenty-two Skilled and Technical Sciences Education Pathways, within the following eight categories:

> Building Trades
> Communication
> Mechanics and Repairs
> Personal Services
> Precision Production Trades
> Protective Services
> Transportation and Material Moving
> Visual Arts

Bailey TolandWhile attending Stansbury High School, Bailey Toland participated in the Skilled and Technical Sciences Education Law Enforcement Pathway with the goal to pursue a career in criminal justice. Bailey was involved in the Salt Lake City Explorers Program, with the Salt Lake City Police Department, where she further explored a career in law enforcement by being involved in police operations. Bailey plans enter the Police Academy when she turns 21.

“CTE courses have helped me by giving me the chance to make sure I really wanted to go into a [law enforcement] career. CTE has given me a view on what to expect in college and the classes I will be taking. I have had a huge head-start on my classes for college because of CTE,” said Bailey.

Stars and Skills for the Top Ten Occupations in Skilled and Technical Sciences
The following are rated “5 Star” occupations by the Utah Department of Workforce Services, and each occupation is projected to –

  • Employ 1,670 or more Utah workers in 2022.
  • Offer openings for at least 70 new Utah workers every year through 2022.
  • Pay median hourly wages of at least $24.40 in Utah.

Focus on chartTop Ten Skills

Utah SkillsUSA 2015 NLSC Contest Results

Friday, July 17th, 2015

By Dave Milliken, National SkillsUSA Board Member
Utah Skilled and Technical Sciences specialist, Utah State Office of Education

RoboticsUtah SkillsUSA members joined their peers from across the country at the 2015 SkillsUSA National Leadership and Skills Conference (NLSC) June 20-26, 2015, in Louisville, Kentucky. At the conference, 182 secondary (104) and postsecondary (78) Utah SkillsUSA student members competed in 77 of 100 skill competitions. Forty-seven of these students were medalists, with 24 receiving a gold medal, 12 receiving a silver medal, and 11 receiving a bronze medal. From architectural drafting to automotive refinishing technology to carpentry to welding fabrication, Utah SkillsUSA student members competed against their peers with a high level of skill, unmatched determination, and focused concentration.

For the first time in SkillsUSA history middle/junior high school students attended the NLSC and competed in one contest, the team engineering challenge. Although each Nicholas Pinchuk2middle/junior high student was young in age they competed with brave determination beyond their years, as high school and college SkillsUSA student members cheered them on.

In his keynote speech, Nick Pinchuk, Chairman and CEO of Snap-on Incorporated, told SkillsUSA members, “You are respected and connected and educated and motivated and dedicated and prepared and skilled! You are going to ensure the future of America. I have confidence in it and so should you.”

SkillsUSA Championships: By the Numbers
> 36 million dollars in total in-kind industry contributions (donated time, equipment, or materials)
> 1.2 million square feet (equivalent to the area of more than 20 football fields) of contest space
> 76,000 square feet of indoor and outdoor exhibits, including 122 companies and institutions
> 60,000 volunteer hours
> 6,106 competitors
> 1,125 medals presented (gold, silver, and bronze)
> 1,000 judges
> 650 technical committee members
> 600+ conference participants participated in the community service project sponsored by GOJO
> 340 National Education Team/volunteer conference management staff
> 175 recognition awards
> 150 Courtesy Corps volunteers
> 112 individuals and 12 teams received the President’s Volunteer Service Award
> 100 hands-on and leadership contests
> 75 $1,000 scholarships awarded to competitors for travel to the conference, sponsored by the mikeroweWORKS Foundation

General NLSC photoSkillsUSA members celebrated their talents and also celebrated the impact SkillsUSA has had on their personal lives, making each member a Champion at Work. In 1965, the founders of SkillsUSA and approximately 200 students and teachers held a conference in Nashville, Tennessee. They set in motion events and aspirations that are very real today. Five decades later, SkillsUSA has become an unstoppable nationwide network of students and instructors who share a common bond with industry.

Utah SkillsUSA: By the Numbers
Congratulations to the Utah SkillsUSA secondary and postsecondary student members who competed in 29 different contests at the 2015 SkillsUSA NLSC. More than 120 Utah advisors, administrators, parents, and family members observed Utah SkillsUSA members compete.

Secondary SkillsUSA Student Members
6 national medalists
> 4 bronze medalists
> 1 silver medalists
> 1 gold medalists

Congratulations to the high school student members who came close to standing on the medals podium. Six students earned a fourth place finish and two earned a fifth place finish in their respective contests.

Postsecondary SkillsUSA Student Members
41 national medalists
> 23 gold medalists
> 11 silver medalists
> 7 bronze medalists
Utah Valley University earned more medals than most of the states competing; and Southern Utah University, Salt Lake Community College, and several of the Utah College of Applied Technology Colleges dominated in many of the competitions.

Congratulations to the postsecondary student members who came close to standing on the medals podium. Ten students earned a fourth place finish and ten students earned a fifth place finish in their respective contests.

Utah ranked fifth in receiving the most medals of any one state, moving up from seventh last year. HERE is the list of contest results.