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Archive for the ‘Skilled and Technical Sciences Education’ Category

Meet a Fire Dept. Captain: Matthew Boulden

Wednesday, February 8th, 2012

PERSONAL CAREER BRIEF

Introducing… Matthew J. Boulden

A graduate of … Brighton High School

Now working as … An Fire Department Captain and Paramedic

For … Murray City.

American National Government was his favorite high school class because … he had a great teacher (thank you, Coach Chavis) who held students accountable for everything they did.

Mathew’s first job – was a Ranch Hand.

The worst job?  Runner for a law firm. What made it unpleasant was working with people who had high opinion of themselves for reasons not apparent to anyone else!

Advice to students … ”Be accountable for your actions, learn how to get along with others, and be willing to put in a hard day’s work without complaint … and – never settle for average!”

And more …

  • What Matthew finds most fulfilling about his job is that he has the chance of “working with dedicated people, willing to put their lives on the line in order to save a complete stranger.”

Meet a TV News Producer: Shelby Dobson

Tuesday, February 7th, 2012

PERSONAL CAREER BRIEF

Introducing… Shelby Dobson

A graduate of … Mountain Crest High School

Now working as … A TV News Producer

For … KSTU, Fox13, Salt Lake City, Utah.

Journalism was her favorite high school class because … it was like on-the-job training since – as editor in chief of the high school newspaper – she wrote news, entertainment, sports and opinion pieces.

Shelby’s first job – was an After School Student Aide at an elementary school.

The worst job? Even though Shelby had her share of low paid, entry jobs, she says the actual work she’s been assigned has never been all that bad.  (She understands some of this is luck, but it is also good to be able to choose jobs that you can do happily most of the time!)  

Advice to students … “take every opportunity you can to advance in your chosen field. For example, I completed a job shadow and an internship. Both were good experiences that helped me understand my field better.”

 And more

  • As the producer of the 5:00 p.m. newscast … “I select local, national and world stories for the newscast. I write several of those stories and I have an associate producer that also helps write for the show. I put the stories in the order they will air. During the show, I talk with reporters in the field, and communicate with anchors about any changes. I also time the show.”
  • Being involved in high school publications –newspaper, yearbook, etc. is “a good way to get started in any field in journalism.”
  • First, get a degree. Whether it’s a high school diploma, training certificate, or Associates or Bachelors, it will help you get a job in the future. Many students start a degree, but don’t finish it. It’s an investment, but it’s an investment worth making!

 

 

Wanted: Skilled Workers!

Monday, October 17th, 2011

Did you see the story about Career and Technical Education (CTE) on the CBS Evening News? Reporter Elaine Quijano visited with John McGlade, president and CEO of Air Products and last year’s SkillsUSA CEO Champion of the Year, about the role of career and technical education in preparing students to enter the world of work. John was selected because of his company’s commitment to SkillsUSA. This opportunity gave John a chance to share his passion and support for CTE and talk about the need for skilled workers. Watch the full CBS Evening News story here.

Nationwide, there is a great demand for skilled workers. “There is going to be more and more of those skilled jobs that are available, that are going to be paying and provide a sustaining career for years and years to come,” McGlade said.

Utah students can obtain the skills that are in demand, by so many industries, through participation in Career and Technical Education. SkillsUSA is the Career and Technical Student Organization (CTSO) for students in Skilled and Technical Sciences. SkillsUSA provides quality education experiences for students in leadership, teamwork, citizenship, and character development. By following a CTE Pathway students can obtain industry certification and college credit while in high school.

“All the CTE courses I took in high school have prepared me to be a strategic thinker and hands-on  learner. CTE has prepared me to go straight from high school in to the welding industry.”

—Shyann Young
Graduate, Fremont High School

 

 

Advocate for CTE by leaving a comment about the story on the CBS Evening News.

SkillsUSA: Champions at Work!

Monday, September 26th, 2011

In June, over 5,700 students competed in the 48th Annual SkillsUSA National Leadership and Skills Conference in Kansas City. Of the 5,700 contestants 132 were Utah students. This conference showcased the best Career and Technical Education students in the nation, who first competed in their state and then advanced to the national competition.

 

The philosophy of the SkillsUSA Championships is to reward students for excellence, to involve industry in directly evaluating student performance, and to keep training relevant to employers’ needs.

From cabinetmaking to cosmetology to Web design to telecommunications, Utah students competed in approximately 75 competitions. Students participating in SkillsUSA were required to complete a series of challenges. Congratulations to the eleven SkillsUSA 2011 secondary winners and to the 33 SkillsUSA 2011 postsecondary winners. Each student competed with dignity and represented the state of Utah extremely well.

Secondary Winners:
Kaydee Walters
Tooele High School
Gold medal winner in cabinetmaking

“[CTE] classes, my participation and leadership in SkillsUSA, and all the classes I will be taking in college will help me to enter and succeed in cabinetmaking and architectural woodwork.” Kaydee Walters

McKinzie Madsen
Desert Hills High School
Gold medal winner in advertising design

Maya Pendleton, Alexander Millar, Karlie Boam
Ben Lomond High School
Silver medal winner for chapter display

Brooke Miller
Skyline High School
Silver medal winner in job interview

Katrina Warkentin and Eliza Brown
Canyons Technical Education Center
Silver medal in nail care

Collin Rogow
Canyons Technical Education Center
Silver medal in telecommunications cabling

Rico Montoya and Elli Petersen
Canyons Technical Education Center
Silver in Web design

Watch a recap of the events at the National Skills and Leadership Conference for SkillsUSA in Kansas City at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VTt6AxUgOyE.

“As we start a new year with current and new participants, I hope that all of our student and professional members recognize the value of full participation in SkillsUSA. There is tremendous potential for professional development, leadership development, social activities, service activities and many opportunities for students to kick-start their current and future career efforts. Near the end of the year we will add the “icing on the cake” that comes from local, regional, state and national competitions, where our students prove that they can compete with the very best career professionals that our country has to offer.”
Richard Wittwer, SkillsUSA Utah State Director

Join the 13,000 Utah SkillsUSA  members and the 264,000 National SkillsUSA members to develop skills to be successful in your future career. Contact your school SkillsUSA advisor to learn more about SkillsUSA.

Like national SkillsUSA members on Facebook.
Follow national SkillsUSA members on Twitter.

Meet a Cabinetmaking Student

Tuesday, August 2nd, 2011
Kaydee Walters graduated in June from Tooele High School where she was a member of the track and field team and the SkillsUSA Vice President. As Vice President, Kaydee joined with the Tooele High School SkillsUSA chapter to collect over 800 lbs. of food for the local food bank. This service project was in conjunction with the SkillsUSA National Week of Service.

 

 

During her last two years of high school Kaydee participated in several SkillsUSA competitions. Last year, she was a member of the Quiz Bowl team who won first place at the state competition and then placed ninth at the national competition. In March, Kaydee participated in the state SkillsUSA cabinetmaking competition where she placed first. In June, she advanced to the SkillsUSA National Skills and Leadership Conference in Kansas City. In this competition students received a set of plans they have never seen before and were required to build the project within six hours. The students were given only enough materials to do it right the first time. Projects were scored on an accuracy of 1/32 inch. Kaydee performed with accuracy and precision. She was the gold medal winner in cabinetmaking surpassing 49 competitors—all of whom were male. Kaydee was the first female, ever, to win this competition.

Woodworking is Kaydee’s passion and has been for a long time. “Throughout my high school career I focused on the Cabinetmaking/Millwork CTE Pathway.” Michael Florence, Kaydee’s cabinetmaking instructor says, “Early on, Kaydee exhibited the potential to be a skilled woodworker. Kaydee designed and built her first personal woodworking project with very little help. The craftsmanship was not perfect, but the understanding and ability she displayed during its design and construction was outstanding.” Through hard work, perseverance and dedication Kaydee honed her skills and became a skilled craftsman. “I am very dedicated to my work. I am a hard worker. I am motivated, strong willed, and efficient. . . My CTE classes in high school prepared me in many ways. Such as teaching me the knowledge I needed to know about woodworking, learning about all the tools and machines and how to use them, and how to create and read plans.”

Kaydee completed the Cabinetmaking/Millwork Pathway and received the CTE Secondary Pathways Completer Recognition Award. She also received a CTE Scholarship and Tuition Award to Utah Valley University (UVU) where she will be studying Cabinetry and Architectural Woodworking to earn an associate degree. “Upon completing my degree I will find a job in a cabinetmaking and architectural woodworking business, like Fetzer Architectural Woodwork, or a similar company that produces high quality, custom made furniture and cabinetry. This will allow me to gain the experience I will need to obtain my ultimate goal of owning and operating my own custom woodworking business.”

“[CTE] classes, my participation and leadership in SkillsUSA, and all the classes I will be taking in college will help me to enter and succeed in cabinetmaking and architectural woodwork.”

UtahCTE.org congratulates Kaydee on her many accomplishments and wishes her all the best as she advances to college and career.

Build a Skill for Life

Thursday, July 21st, 2011

Students interested in manufacturing tend to have a few traits in common: they are problem solvers, creative thinkers, good with computers, and meticulous about details. If these traits describe you then you should consider a career in manufacturing. In today’s knowledge-based workplace skilled workers are at a premium. Those who are successful have specialized skills, hands-on training, and problem-solving skills. In every manufacturing occupation a working knowledge of math is crucial. Students working in manufacturing will need to easily calculate mathematical problems using concepts learned from algebra, geometry, and trigonometry.

Through Career and Technical Education, Skilled and Technical Sciences Education (STS) has five Pathways in Precision Production Trades that lead to careers in manufacturing. By taking STS courses students can obtain industry certification and be ready to work in a manufacturing career shortly after high school.

Precision Production Trades
Cabinetmaking/Millwork Pathway
Drafting/CAD Pathway
Graphics/Printing Pathway
Machine Tool
Welding

Manufacturing in Utah:
> There are over 3,974 manufacturing firms in the state.
> 113,000 people are employed in the manufacturing industry.
> Payroll in the manufacturing industry totals over $1.3 million.
> The average monthly wage in the manufacturing industry is $3,962,
    which is 16.8 percent higher than the statewide average monthly wage.
> Manufacturing equals 8.9 percent of all state employment.
> Utah’s manufacturing industry is currently the 3rd largest industry
    in the state for total employment.
(Source: Utah Manufacturers Association and Utah Department of Workforce Services) 

Kaydee Walters

Jobs in manufacturing require workers who can interpret blueprints, program computerized machining, and solve problems quickly. Kaydee Walters, a recent graduate from Tooele High School, was the gold medal winner in cabinetmaking at the National Skills and Leadership Conference for SkillsUSA in Kansas City. She was the first female, ever, to win this competition. Through participation in CTE Kaydee learned and mastered the specialized skills that will lead her to a successful career in manufacturing. “My CTE classes in high school prepared me in many ways. Such as teaching me the knowledge I needed to know about woodworking, learning about all the tools and machines and how to use them, and how to create and read plans.”

Get started and build a skill for life!

CTE and Law Enforcement as a Career

Friday, February 4th, 2011

Tanner Kussee: Student, Davis High School

High school is a great time to try out a wide range of Career Pathways by enrolling in Career and Technical Education (CTE) courses. Through participation in CTE you will be guided as you take courses in your chosen pathway and also have the opportunity to participate in an internship. Tanner Kussee, a student at Davis High School, did just that.

Tanner is interested in law enforcement and recently interned with the Davis County Sheriff’s Department. He learned about the different areas in the Sheriff’s Department and had the opportunity to work in: corrections, dispatch, the courts, and the crime lab. He also went on patrol with an officer. “In corrections I found out what the different cells were called and how much security was needed for each one. In dispatch it was a blast; everyone was super happy and were all willing to help out.”

In CTE you will explore different careers, learn about your interests and abilities, discover your likes and dislikes, and acquire specific job training skills. For instance, during Tanner’s internship he discovered “. . . I would not like to work in a courtroom. I do not like just sitting and listening to what people have done wrong. I did enjoy working in the crime lab. It was great to do experiments to test marijuana and heroin and other drugs; and to figure out what marijuana looked like underneath a microscope, and test its potency using chemicals. The last area that I got to work with was patrol. I got to actually ride along with the deputies.”

In Utah, opportunities in the area of law enforcement are unlimited and include patrol officer, bike and foot patrol officer, community police officer, detective, canine officer, DARE/school resource officer, special weapons and tactics, training officer, and a variety of supervisory positions. Law enforcement is a challenging and rewarding profession, limited only by the abilities of the individual officer. “This whole [internship] experience has given me a different perspective on a career as a law enforcement officer and which direction I want to take.”

Tooele High School Students

Learn more about the Law Enforcement Pathway and other Skilled and Technical Science Pathways at www.UtahCTE.org.

CTE Pathway offers Pathways to your future: get started!

Auto Mechanics: Hands-on, Skill-building, and Confidence-inspiring

Tuesday, February 1st, 2011

By Lara Dobson
Student, Skyline High School

My eyes fluttered open to see the blinding white walls of the classroom. The bell had just rung signaling the end of third period. I raised my head and looked down at the crowded text of my Chemistry book. I knew I would be up late that night finishing the work I hadn’t started during class. I pried myself from the chair, threw my backpack over my shoulder, and started walking to fourth period. Down the history hall, out the side doors, across the sidewalk, and into the Auto Mechanics building. As always, my nose was flooded with the scent of oil and gasoline. I plopped down in a chair, but knew I wouldn’t be stationary for long. We were learning how to rotate tires that day. After a brief discussion on the plan, I put on my trusty blue mechanic suit and entered the shop. The noise coming from the drills, combined with sparks flying from a welder had me energized instantly. I listened impatiently as our teacher showed us step by step how to rotate the tires, anxious to get some hands-on experience. But, when I finally got the drill in my hands, I felt completely lost! The truth is, I had never held a drill – let alone been expected to use one – in my entire life. It took perseverance, but with practice and the help of my fellow classmates, I felt pretty competent by the end of the class.  Imagine; me, a skilled mechanic!