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Results: 2016 Utah Digital Media Arts Festival

May 4th, 2016

Tooele_IT_IMG_0141On Wednesday, May 3, 2016, students from across the state gathered at Utah Valley University to display their digital artwork at the 2016 Utah Digital Media Arts Festival. From photography to 3D graphics to 2D animation, students competed in this yearly competition/festival to showcase his or her best work, and to see projects from all around the state.

Congratulations to the following students who placed “Best of Show.”

Digital Photography
Alec Burnett, Northridge High School

Composite Photography
Alec Burnett, Northridge High School

Raster Graphics
Eliza Anderson, Granite Technical Institute

Vector Graphics
Jasmin Alfaro, Clearfield High School

2D Animation
Kenneth Volcanes, Clearfield High School

3D Graphics
Jessica Stratton, Box Elder High School

3D Animation
Cole Monson, Springville High School

Video
TJ Hollister, Nebo-Advanced Learning Center

Audio
Jason Hammer, Layton High School

Stop Motion Animation
Ben Baros, Canyons Technical Education Center

Web
Gavin Robinson and Grant Schmidt, Jordan Applied Technology Center

Game Design
Kaleb Lott, Nebo-Advanced Learning Center

T-Shirt and Poster
Zoe Tippetts, Corner Canyon High School

View the full list of winners.

Save the date for the 2017 Utah Digital Media Arts Festival to be held in May 2017. Watch for details at www.udmaf.org.

Congratulations to Utah CTE Educators!

May 2nd, 2016

W._FRAZIER-SNYDERUtah was well represented at the recent Region V ACTE Leadership Conference. Along with colleagues from other Region V states, the record number of about 400 attendees were treated to education and career tours, presentations on topics from Advocacy to Technology (and everything in between), vendor resources, and many opportunities for networking. Utah Career and Technical Education (CTE) Educator Pepper Poulsen (CTE Coordinator in Jordan School District) served on the Conference Planning Committee, and Peter Edmondson served on the Awards Committee.

The final conference session was an opportunity to recognize some outstanding CTE educators in the region, including the following Utah professionals:

  • Hope Blackburn, Nominee for Region V New Teacher of the Year
  • Rebecca Lawver, Nominee for Region V Postsecondary Teacher of the Year
  • Wendy Frazier-Snyder, WINNER! Teacher of the Year
  • Clay Christensen, Nominee for Administrator of the Year
  • Camille Williams, Nominee for Carl Perkins Community Service Award
  • Ruth Dallas, Nominee for Career Guidance Award
  • Pam Rock, Nominee for Lifetime Achievement Award

Highlights of the conference can be viewed in a video that has been posted online.

Related story:
American Fork High photography teacher ‘is way out there’ with innovation

I Want to Help Students Reach Their Potential

April 19th, 2016

By Halee Gleave, senior at Richfield High School

Halee Gleave photoGabrielle Bernstein once said, “Allow your passion to become your purpose, and it will one day become your profession.” Ever since I was a little girl, my parents have taught me the value of education. When I was in elementary school, I remember them reading with me each night and helping me complete assignments. Learning became my passion at a very young age because of it. Since that time, my passion has grown into my purpose as I have had opportunities to share it. I have enjoyed tutoring high school students for the past two years. It inspired me to question a profession in education. This past semester, I have further explored that possibility as I have interned in a first grade class. I have observed daily classroom procedures, helped the teacher prepare for lessons, assisted with and corrected students’ assignments, and worked with students individually on reading fluency.

This internship finalized my decision to become a teacher. This fall, I will be attending Southern Utah University and majoring in elementary education. As I have interacted with young students, I have recognized a passion in them and my love for them has grown. I have seen the power education has had in my own life and I want to help students reach their potential. It has motivated me to continue to transform my passion and purpose into my profession.

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Early Childhood Education is one of seven Career and Technical Education Pathways in the Family and Consumer Sciences Education program area. CTE Internships are part of the Work-Based Learning (WBL) program. To participate in the Early Childhood Education Pathway talk to your school counselor. To participate in a CTE Internship talk to the WBL coordinator at your school.

Career and Technical Education (CTE) provides all students with a seamless education system from public education to postsecondary education, driven by a Plan for College and Career Readiness/SEOP. Through competency-based instruction and hands-on experiences, students obtain certified occupational skills, culminating in further education and meaningful employment. CTE prepares students for careers that are most in demand and that are part of the economic development of the state.

TSA Student Scholarships

April 7th, 2016

JATC_TE_IMG_2702This year, the Technology Student Association (TSA) is offering two $2,500 scholarships to eligible TSA student members. The scholarships are available to graduating high school seniors who are active members of an affiliated TSA chapter. TSA alumni enrolled in an undergraduate program or career and technical school are also eligible.

Scholarship 1: The William P. Elrod Memorial Scholarship honors the memory of Mr. William P. Elrod who was one of the founding fathers of TSA.

Scholarship 2: The Future STEM Teacher Scholarship is designed to assist high school graduates in pursuing a career as a K-12 STEM teacher.

The application deadline for each scholarship is Monday, May 2, 2016.

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The Technology Student Association (TSA) is a national organization of students engaged in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). Open to students enrolled in or who have completed technology education courses, TSA’s membership includes over 233,000 middle and high school students in approximately 2,000 schools spanning 49 states. TSA is supported by educators, parents and business leaders who believe in the need for a technologically literate society. Members learn through exciting competitive events, leadership opportunities and much more. The diversity of activities makes TSA a positive experience for every student. From engineers to business managers, our alumni credit TSA with a positive influence on their lives.

ACTE Trophy Design Contest

April 7th, 2016

JATC_IT_IMG_2410The Association of Career and Technical Education (ACTE) has announced a first-ever student contest to re-design the 3D-printed trophies for the ACTE Excellence Awards. The ACTE Excellence Awards promote excellence in Career and Technical Education, recognizing individuals who have made extraordinary contributions to CTE.

In 2013, ACTE presented its national winners with the first ACTE trophies created by 3D printers. ACTE partnered with Stratasys to manufacture the 3D printed trophies, designed by Douglas Koch, associate professor and chair of the School of Technology at the University of Central Missouri. The ACTE Trophy Design Contest will give students the opportunity to share their skills and talents as they design a unique 3D image for the trophy. The winning trophy design will be printed by Stratasys and presented to the 10 national award winners at the 2016 ACTE Awards Banquet.

Who: The contest is open to secondary, postsecondary, and adult CTE students in 3D design courses or other CAD courses.
Prize: $1,000 scholarship
How to Apply: Online at the ACTE Awards Portal
Deadline: Entries are due by Sunday, May, 1, 2016.

For contest details and requirements visit acteonline.org and search for 2016 Student Trophy Design Contest.

The Making of the ACTE Awards

 

Nathan Stokes: Community Volunteer and Intern

April 6th, 2016

Nathan Stokes photoNathan Stokes, a senior at Syracuse High School, has volunteered with the GOAL Foundation for nearly four years. He learned about the opportunity to volunteer with the GOAL Foundation during his freshman year of high school. Prior to joining the GOAL Foundation, Nathan joined a local service community run completely by youth ages 14-19, whose purpose was to serve the community. “I remember how my fellow group members described events hosted by the GOAL Foundation; these events made you want to volunteer,” said Nathan.

Nathan describes the GOAL Foundation’s marquee event as a unique event that brings the community together. “One particular event that comes to mind every time I think about the GOAL Foundation is their marquee event, the Ogden Marathon. What makes the Ogden Marathon unique is the fact that it is a local community event. It is hosted by a community group, the volunteers are from the community, it is run by community members, and it is sponsored by favorite community vendors. There is something special about a community-based organization, rather than focusing on the large profits and expansion, truly focusing on quality care of its customers and participants. I have seen the employees of the GOAL Foundation constantly work to make sure that everyone is being taken care of like a family, whether it is through aid-stations on a run, local school involvement, or helping students realize the benefits of living healthier lives.”

After volunteering for several years, Nathan is now working as a high school intern with the GOAL Foundation. “I am now working as a high school intern with the GOAL Foundation family, and seeing just how much hard work and dedication is put forth to serve the betterment of our community. As society continues to grow and evolve in a world that is becoming more self-focused, it is important that we hold onto the idea of helping our local community. Community is family, and when the dust settles family still remains. I enjoy serving in my community with a company whose entire interest is the community.”

Apply Now: The mikeroweWORKS Foundation Competitor Scholarship

March 31st, 2016

Dave and Mike RoweIn partnership with SkillsUSA, the mikeroweWORKS Foundation is proud to offer a scholarship opportunity for SkillsUSA members. The mikeroweWORKS Foundation scholarship provides assistance to eligible students who are pursuing an education in manufacturing, construction, automotive, engineering, and STEM-related careers. Apply now to receive financial assistance to attend the SkillsUSA National Championship in Louisville, Kentucky.

What: The mikeroweWORKS Foundation Competitor Scholarship 

Who: SkillsUSA student members (secondary and postsecondary) who have competed and placed first in their state association competition.

Why: To receive financial assistance to attend the SkillsUSA National Championships, June 20-24, 2016 in Louisville, Kentucky.

How:
> The award is based on a student-written, one-page narrative, describing the financial need for the scholarship, including the lack of school or community resources in order to attend the 2016 SkillsUSA National Championships.
> A letter of support/recommendation written by the students advisor, or state director.

Requirements:
> Must be a gold medal winner at the 2016 state competition, advancing to national competition.
> Have never attended the National Leadership and Skills Conference prior to this year.
> Be a SkillsUSA member in good standing.
> Must reasonably demonstrate financial need for scholarship.

Deadline: Application is due Friday, May 27, 2016 (midnight EDT).

View the list of 2015 scholarship recipients.

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The mikeroweWORKS Foundation is a 501(c)(3) public charity that promotes work ethic and supports the skilled trades. As CEO of the Foundation, Mike Rowe spends a significant amount of time speaking about the country’s dysfunctional relationship with work, highlighting the widening skills gap, and challenging the persistent belief that a four-year degree is automatically the best path for the most people. Through its scholarship programs, including the Work Ethic Scholarship Program and the SkillsUSA Travel Scholarships, the Foundation provides financial assistance to qualified individuals with a passion to get trained for a skill that is in demand. The Foundation has been instrumental in granting more than $3 million in education for trade schools across the country. For more information, go to www.mikeroweworks.org.

Save the Date: 2016 Utah Digital Media Arts Festival

March 30th, 2016

Box Elder_IT_IMG_0304On May 3, 2016, Utah students will compete in the 2016 Utah Digital Media Arts Festival. From Web design to 3D graphics to 2D animation, the Utah Digital Media Arts Festival is a yearly competition/festival that gives Utah high school students the opportunity to showcase his or her best work. Students also have the opportunity to see projects from all around the state.

Who: Utah High School Students

What: 2016 Utah Digital Media Arts Festival

Where: Utah Valley University

When: Tuesday, May 3, 2016

View the list of winners from last year’s competition.
T-Shirt and Poster
Raster Graphics
Photography
Vector Graphics
3D Graphics
2D Animation
Audio
3D Animation
Video
Stop Motion
3D Graphics
Game Design

Utah Awarded New Skills for Youth Grant

March 30th, 2016

Girl_grad_blurr_backgroundUtah has been awarded a grant through JPMorgan Chase & Co’s New Skills for Youth initiative. This initiative focuses on the commitment to ensure more young people graduate from high school prepared for college and well-paying careers. This grant will allow Utah to develop detailed career readiness action plans, which are an essential step to expanding economic opportunity for young people.

The New Skills for Youth state grant is one piece of a $75 million, five-year initiative developed by JPMorgan Chases, in collaboration with the Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO) and Advance Career and Technical Education (CTE), aimed at strengthening career-focused education, starting in high school and ending with postsecondary degrees or credentials aligned with high-skill jobs.

“States across the country are adjusting their career readiness programs to ensure they adequately prepare students for their next step after graduation,” said Chris Minnich, executive director of CCSSO. “States have seized this grant opportunity to pursue bold plans for pathways that will put kids on a course for success after high school and beyond.”

New Skills for Youth builds on CCSSO’s Career Readiness Initiative, launched in 2015 to help close the skills gap in this country. The goal is to ensure that students are not only college-ready, but that all children also graduate from high school well prepared for careers in high-skill, high-demand fields.

“We are anxious to develop a career readiness action plan for our students and pleased to be a part of this helpful public-private partnership to move this critical work forward. This grant gives Utah the assistance and support needed to meet Utah student needs in both school and the workforce,” said Sydnee Dickson, Utah Interim State Superintendent of Public Instruction.

Press Release
States Awarded Grants to Improve Career Preparation Systems for Young People

Ag Teachers Are a Class Above

March 29th, 2016

Hurricane_Ag_IMG_4953Thinking about becoming an agriculture teacher? Here are the Top 5 reasons you should pursue a career in the classroom:

1. Ag Teachers Never Have the Same Day Twice.
One day, agriculture teachers might be in a classroom or laboratory, the next visiting students in the field, preparing teams for an FFA Career Development Event, or leading a community service activity with their FFA chapter.

2. There’s a Teacher Shortage.
Nationally, we need more agriculture teachers. That produces a climate ripe for achieving employment immediately after college graduation. It is estimated that there will be hundreds of unfilled positions across the United States this year, simply because not enough students are choosing to be agricultural educators. Agricultural educators are often on extended contracts, which means they get paid during the summer months and have the potential to earn a significantly higher salary than other teachers.

3. Share Your Passion.
For many FFA members, agricultural education has played a huge role in their lives. From classroom instruction to hours spent preparing and competing, it’s a contagious brand of leadership and skills development. What’s better than taking that enthusiasm and using it to teach the next generation of agriculture leaders? As an agricultural educator, you’ll be leading the way by sharing your passion for our future. Because agriculture is such a broad subject, we need people with all experiences and backgrounds. Urban agriculture is gaining in popularity, as is the addition of ag programs in urban settings. Did you know there are agriculture programs in Chicago and New York City? The only things potential ag teachers should have are a strong work ethic, dependability, and a passion for working with young people through agriculture.

4. It’s a Community.
Agricultural education is very much a family group. Ag teachers help each other out. That is one of the things that makes being an ag teacher so rewarding. The relationships you build with other ag teachers by going to workshops, state and national FFA convention, and other professional settings bring satisfaction and provide support when needed. Many states have mentoring programs for new ag teachers. These mentors guide you through your first few years on the job and help you become successful.

5. Make a Difference.
Agricultural education uses a three-circle model of instruction. These are classroom and laboratory instruction, leadership development, and experiential learning. The successful integration of each of these three components results in a strong program that produces well-rounded individuals who are prepared to be leaders in agriculture, business and industry. This allows you to reach students who might not succeed in a traditional classroom. It also allows cutting-edge topics like cloning, satellite mapping, biofuels, alternative energy and more to be introduced to the next generation of agriculture’s leaders.

Get Started in Agricultural Education
Talk to your teacher or school counselor about how to get started on the path to becoming an ag teacher. Here are some tips to help you get going:

> Talk to your ag teacher about what his or her job is like.
> Ask your teacher to schedule a job shadowing or internship experience for you.
> Develop a supervised agricultural experience program (SAE) involving agricultural education.
> Check out colleges and universities that offer a degree in agricultural education.

“Do what you love. Love what you do. Teach AG!” says Buddy Deimler, Agricultural Education specialist at the Utah State Office of Education and Utah FFA advisor.

Thanks to the National Association of Agricultural Educators’ Teach Ag campaign for much of this content. Learn about Teach Ag at www.naae.org/teaching.

The blog was originally posted on FFA New Horizons.