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U.S. Occupational Projections for 2012-2022

February 3rd, 2014

It takes intense analysis of a vast amount of information, but every other year, the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) publishes occupational projections for successive 10-year periods of time. BLS shares their view of how employment is expected to change between 2012 and 2022 in the most recent edition of the Occupational Outlook Quarterly. Highlighted below are lists featuring “top ten” occupations by education level, based on projected job openings. Be aware that the education level reflects assignments made by job analysts based on what is minimally required to enter an occupation. For any occupation of high interest, you should gather information to help you get the big picture –e.g., related training and experience often needed in addition to education in order to get that first job and to advance, earnings information, as well as factors that help you see how the occupation matches your interests, values and other personal characteristics.

Top Ten Occupations by Education Level Based on Projected Job Openings 2012-2022 (Linked to Page for Related CTE Area of Study

High School Diploma
Customer Service Representative
Office Clerk
Secretaries/Admin Assistant
Childcare Worker
Supervisor of Office Workers
Sales Representatives
Receptionist
Maintenance & Repair Worker
Bookkeeping Clerk
Supervisor of Food Prep Workers

Associate Degree or Postsecondary Non-Degree
Registered Nurse
Nursing Assistant
Truck Driver
Licensed Practical Nurse
Medical Assistant
Hairdresser/Cosmetologist
Preschool Teacher
Dental Assistant
HVAC Mechanic/Installer
EMT/Paramedic

Bachelor’s Degree
General Operations Manager
Accountants/Auditors
Elementary School Teachers
Management Analysts
Software Developer
Middle School Teacher
Computer Systems Analyst
Market Research Analyst
Construction Manager
Health Services Manager

FCCLA Super Bowl Ad Challenge

January 31st, 2014

In the spirit of the Super Bowl, FCCLA is hosting the first ever FCCLA Week Super Bowl Ad Challenge! From January 16 to February 7, chapters will be able to submit their own “viral” ad via YouTube (up to 30 seconds) or Instagram (up to 15 seconds) that celebrates “the Ultimate Leadership Experience”.

Who: FCCLA chapters

What: Super Bowl Ad Challenge

When: January 16 to February 7

Why: To promote why FCCLA is the Ultimate Leadership Experience.

How: Produce a “viral video” about why FCCLA is the Ultimate Leadership Experience and upload to YouTube (30 second video) or Instagram (15 second video). Be sure to follow the official rules of the FCCLA Super Bowl Ad Challenge.

Submission: Participating chapters must fully complete and submit an online registration form and upload their video to YouTube OR Instagram. Only one video entry per chapter, via one platform, will be considered.

Deadline: Friday, February 7, 2014

Award:
The top three videos:
> Will be announced via social media on Friday, February 14, 2104.
> Will be shown at General Sessions during the
2014 FCCLA National Leadership Conference in San Antonio, Texas, July 6-10, 2014.
> Will be featured in the March/April edition of
Teen Times.

Questions? Email aschantz@fcclainc.org

CTE Moment Photo Contest for Utah Students

January 29th, 2014

Utah Career and Technical Education (CTE) students, as you celebrate CTE Month during February, plan now to participate in the CTE Moment photo contest on the Utah CTE Facebook page. Watch the slideshow featuring CTE Moments across Utah. “Like” the slideshow and then post your comment to indicate the CTE Pathways featured in the slideshow. Or, email your answers to UtahCTE@schools.utah.gov. At the end of the month a winner will be chosen from among the students who correctly identified all of the CTE Pathways featured in the slideshow.

Who: Utah students enrolled in one or more CTE courses.

What: CTE Moment photo contest.

When: February – it’s CTE Month!

How: On the Utah CTE Facebook page, watch the slideshow featuring CTE Moments across Utah. “Like” the slideshow and then post your comment to indicate the CTE Pathways featured in the slideshow. Or, email your answers to UtahCTE@schools.utah.gov.

Prizes: At the end of the month a prize will be awarded to the student who correctly identified all of the CTE Pathways featured in the slideshow.

Meet the Counseling and Guidance Team at Corner Canyon High School

January 28th, 2014

Corner Canyon High School, located in Draper, is the newest high school in Canyons School District. Their student body consists of about 1,800 students in grades 9-12. Interestingly, because seniors could opt out of moving to the new high school, the senior class is the smallest and around one-third of the students are freshman! Just last year, ninth grade was still part of middle school, so these students not only found themselves in high school, but in a big, new high school, and that brought some challenges.

Fortunately, team leader Allyson Hanks (A-C) and fellow counselors Amy Hardcastle (D-H), Sally Matsen (I-M), Dina Kohler (N-R), and Phil Handley (S-Z) were totally up to the challenge. They developed a program – “Get Some Grit” – to increase the awareness of key skills and attitudes they need to succeed in high school and beyond.

Of course there are the other 1,200 students in grades 10-12 to serve, and counselors are equally dedicated to assuring the success of these students. “Visibility” is a key counseling strategy. It is important that students know the counselors – especially their own – and that students perceive their counselors as available and helpful. The number of students who drop in, and the days that counselors are spending in classrooms add up to a focus on student success as they progress through their high school careers.

The “Senior Silver Star” newsletter keeps seniors apprised of dates and deadlines, but also offers them other information to promote their success beyond high school.

Another practice worth mentioning is the building-wide effort to “catch students being good.” School staff carry “Charge Cards” – Care, Honor, Achieve, Respect, Give, Engage – to hand out to students. Students can then enter their cards in drawings for prizes.

This is just a sampling of the counseling and guidance practices being implemented at Corner Canyon High School by a team of exemplary counselors with the support of administrators at both the school and district level. Utah CTE wishes CCHS counselors and students continued success!

Great things are happening in every school across the state. Utah CTE wants to hear from you. Educators and students, what is your CTE story? Tell Utah CTE about what is taking place in your school/classroom by sharing your CTE story.

Students, nominate your favorite school counselors for an “I Love My School Counselor” honor in February, during Career and Technical Education Month. Entries are due Friday, January 31, 2014.

Consider a Career in Agriculture

January 9th, 2014

There is one industry that exists to feed, clothe, and provide for the ever growing world population. That industry is AGRICULTURE. From farming, IT, health science, to education, there are 23 million jobs in Agriculture. This growing industry needs IT specialists, software developers, computer scientists, and engineers. The industry needs people with degrees in plant science, biology, health science, engineering, and food processing. The Agriculture industry also needs experts in communications, public relations, and social media. So, agriculture is just more than planting a seed.

Did you know that by the year 2050 there will be 2.5 billion more people on the planet, and they will need to eat. There’s food for thought!

 

Source: AgroWorld, Some food for thought: Careers in agriculture, posted on YouTube.com January 3, 2014

If you’re interested in a career in Agriculture, talk to your school counselor to register for one of the many courses in Agricultural Education. By taking Agricultural Education courses, you will learn to value and understand the vital role of agriculture, food, fiber, and natural resources systems in advancing personal and global well-being.

Check out the six Utah Agricultural Education Pathways, today.
Agricultural Systems Technology
Horticulture Science
Natural Resource Science
Production/Processing Animal Science
Production/Processing Plant and Soil Science
Production/Processing Science

What is an Educated Person?

January 6th, 2014

By Gary Wixom
Assistant Commissioner for Career and Technical Education
Utah System of Higher Education

Every year during the fall, educators from Utah gather in a meeting room to discuss and consider the question “What is an educated person?” Those in the room are not really confused about what an educated person really is, but in defining and considering the topic, educators can make progress in learning how to educate others.

We usually think of education as a process that we go through and at the end we receive a certificate or degree. But education is much more than a piece of paper detailing competencies that we have learned. The philosophers tell us that education is the process of learning about life, and that without education and “truth” we are not really free.

According to Tony McGregor 1, an educated person has some of the following characteristics.

  1. An educated person has empathy and understanding of other people.
  2. An educated person is sensitive to the needs of others.
  3. An educated person has a clear understanding of their own values, wants,
    and preferences without imposing them on others.
  4. An educated person is independent and takes responsibility for their own actions.
  5. An educated person connects and interacts with the world around them.
  6. An educated person is comfortable with who they are, their own feelings and the feelings of others.

Along with the educated person’s characteristics, an individual needs good technical and employability skills. Employability skills are often referred to as “soft” skills and include things like a positive attitude, understanding how to work hard, being able to communicate well with others, being able to work together with others in solving problems, basic computing skills and showing up on time. These skills along with good technical skills are what make a person prepared for a productive future.

Career and Technical Education programs are designed to help individuals gain these skills and move students along the path to becoming educated. As we look to a new year, take a look at the great opportunities that are available through Career and Technical Education programs at your institution. The doors of the future will open for those who are “educated”. Make sure that you are prepared for that future.

1http://hubpages.com/hub/Chracteristics-of-an-educated-person

Save the Date: February is CTE Month

December 31st, 2013

During the month of February, students, educators, and administrators across the state will join secondary and postsecondary students nationwide in celebrating Career and Technical Education (CTE). Schools can pick a day, a week, or the entire month to spotlight CTE programs.

The 2014 CTE Month theme is:
Career and Technical Education:
Pathways to Lifelong Career Success

Career and Technical Education prepares both youth and adults for a wide range of careers and further educational opportunities. These careers may require varying levels of education—including industry-recognized credentials, postsecondary certificates, and two- and four-year degrees. Career and Technical Education is crucial to providing the strong workforce training needed to fill the good-paying jobs.

CTE Month is a great opportunity to promote your programs and advocate for Career and Technical Education.
> Check out the list of 28 Things to Do During CTE Month.
> Write a blog about an event in your school and submit it to UtahCTE@schools.utah.gov.
> Make a 90-second video about CTE and submit it to UtahCTE@schools.utah.gov.

Details about CTE Month will be announced on Facebook and Twitter.
Visit
UtahCTE.org to join our communities today!

Consider making the following activities part of your celebration:
> Decorate your school with banners and posters.
> Post electronic announcements to your school website, marquee, and bulletin boards.
> Have an open house for parents and the community.
> Make a video profiling successful alumni and where they work.
> Using social media, post on Facebook and tweet the CTE Month events at your school.
> Take and submit a photo of a CTE Moment in your school – #CTEMoment14.

In high school I started taking a variety of CTE courses. Each one
of these courses has taught me so much and has prepared me
for the courses I will be taking in college.
Marissa Muhlestein, graduate of Granger High School

Utah’s Occupational Projections Promise Steady Growth

December 20th, 2013

Good news from the Utah Department of Workforce Services; their occupational projections indicate that the Utah economy will continue to grow steadily through the year 2020. (Utah Insights, Winter 2013) There are 61,040 annual job openings forecasted statewide. The following is a list of occupations in Utah projected to have the most openings. (Numbers reflect total job openings due to replacement of current workers, or “turnover” plus new openings created when new positions are created = TOTAL OPENINGS.)

The Department of Workforce Services also provides this list of the ten “fastest-growing” occupations. Here, the number of openings is expressed as a percentage of the total number of jobs for that occupation. Thus, occupations that are “fastest-growing” may not always mean plentiful openings. In fact, compared to the average base employment of 24,590 for occupations with the most annual openings, the average base employment for occupations with largest percentage change is just 1,260.

 

Check out the complete issue of Utah Insights, Winter 2013 for additional information – including details about Utah’s two fastest-growing occupational groups (Healthcare Support and Construction/Extraction), highest and lowest paying occupational groups, and median annual wages by entry level education. For detailed information on the occupations listed, or other occupations that interest you, browse UtahFutures.

Monthly Math Challenge

December 18th, 2013

TSA members, put your math skills to the test with a monthly math challenge. The challenges began in November 2013 and continue through March 2014. Brain-teasing math problems will be posted at http://teams.tsaweb.org/math-challenge. If you can figure out the math problems you will be eligible to be entered into a monthly drawing.

Who: Middle/junior high and high school TSA members

What: TEAMS Monthly Math Challenge

When: November 2013 through March 2014

Why: To prepare for the 2014 TEAMS competition1.

How: Submit your answer to the Monthly Math Challenge following the instructions at http://teams.tsaweb.org/math-challenge. Coaches will be notified by return email if their student’s answers are correct and those names will automatically be entered in the drawing for that month.

Prize: Only students on teams with an active registration for the 2014 TEAMS competition will be placed in the drawing. Each winner will receive a $25 gift card.

TEAMS: Tests of Engineering Aptitude, Mathematics, and Science

If you are not a member of TSA and would like to become a member, talk to your school counselor to get connected with the TSA advisor in your school.

 

1 The 2014 TEAMS competition is based on the National Academy of Engineering Grand Challenge. The 2014 theme is: “Engineering Tomorrow’s Cities” to restore and improve urban infrastructure. At the competition, students will address engineering challenges in areas such as transportation, green space, and fresh water supply.

Thousands of Utah Students Participated in the Hour of Code Event

December 17th, 2013

Nationwide, over 17 million people participated in an Hour of Code, December 9-15, 2014, with students writing over 563 million lines of code. In Utah, approximately 57,500 elementary, secondary, and postsecondary students participated in the event.

“Southwest Applied Technology College had over 70 students and faculty participate in the Hour of Code. The Hour of Code went so well, some chose to go above and beyond and learn more about programming from codecademy.com and khanacademy.org. I personally think this was a great experience. I can’t wait to see what kind of technology and programs we are going to have [in the future], since many students have now chosen programming as a profession,” said Scott Nelson, Information Technology Teaching Assistant at Southwest Applied Technology College.

Congratulations to Jackson Elementary School, in Salt Lake City, Utah, who was awarded a classroom set of laptop computers, by Computer Science Education Week, for their Hour of Code plan.

National Computer Science Facts:
> Computer science is a top paying college degree.

> Less than 2.4 percent of college students graduate with a degree in computer science. And the numbers have dropped since the last decade.

> Exposure to computer science leads to some of the best-paying jobs in the world. However, 75 percent of the population is underrepresented.

> Computer programming jobs are growing at two times the national average.

> While, 57 percent of bachelor’s degrees are earned by women, just 12 percent of computer science degrees are awarded to women.

> 9 out of 10 schools don’t offer computer programming classes.

> In 36 of 50 states, computer science doesn’t count towards high school graduation math or science requirement.

Source: csedweek.org/promote

Utah Computer Science Facts:
> Utah is one of 14 states that require students to take computer science in order to graduate.

> Approximately one-third of Utah high schools teach computer programming or computer science.

> Approximately 20 Utah schools are teaching a new ninth-grade elective called “Exploring Computer Science.”

“My classes participated in the Hour of Code. I feel like this was a great experience for all of my students to better understand problem solving, but more importantly to get excited about programming. After watching the short intro videos, students were surprised by how many notable people and “cool” people were getting involved in coding. The most exciting thing for me was their enthusiasm for coding. I had a few students complete “Beyond an Hour of Code” (the 20 hour course) for which they received a prize of their choice. What’s even more exciting is that instead of students asking to play games at the end of class, I now have students asking if they can code. What a great opportunity this has been! I would do this again in a heartbeat!” said Kimberly Mendenhall, Computer Technology teacher at Fort Herriman Middle School, Jordan School District.

Students, talk to your school counselor to sign up for a course in one of six Utah Information Technology Education Pathways. By participating in a computer science course you will learn to think creatively, develop problem solving skills, and how to write code.

Utah news stories highlighting the Hour of Code event:
Should Utah require computer coding before graduation?
Event aims to spark kids’ interest in computer science
Monte Vista Students Join Millions in Hour of Code